Staffordshire Hoard is the larg


The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork yet found. Discovered in July 2009 by an amateur metal detecting enthusiast in Litchfield, Staffordshire, this magnificent golden hoard is set to shed light on one of the most mysterious periods of British history. book is the earliest documentary evidence of the religion in the:19:10.:19:17. The Staffordshire Hoard. The hoard of about 3,500 pieces, comprising up to 5 kg (11 lb) of gold and 1.3 kg (2.9 lb) of silver, eclipses, at least in quantity, the 1.5 kg (3.3 lb) hoard found in the Sutton Hoo ship burial in 1939.

Although fragmented and damaged when found, there is nothing comparable in terms of content and quantity in the UK or mainland . University Documentary on Staffordshire Hoard.Not sure if this was the final edit The largest hoard of Anglo Saxon gold ever found, was discovered this summer by a metal-detectorist in a field in Staffordshire and is set to revolutionise our perceptions of life in the 7th and 8th centuries. The Staffordshire Hoard brings this question into sharp relief because the narrative of its discovery powerfully amplifies the beauty and mystery of its contents. Show more It contains just under 4,000 objects and broken fragments, most of which are war-gear. The Staffordshire Hoard: An Anglo-Saxon Treasure tells the story of the Staffordshire Hoard's discovery and acquisition, and the six-year research project that pieced its fragments back together, identified its objects and explored their manufacture. The Hoard offers 1500 new clues into the Dark Ages and Dan pieces together the lives of the people living in these long-forgotten kingdoms. Some of the hoard of items found just below the surface of a cultivated field in south Staffordshire in July go on display at Birmingham Museum. An early group dates from the mid 6th century AD. It consists of over 3,500 items, amounting to a total of 5.1 kg (11 lb) of gold, 1.4 kg (3 lb) of silver and some 3,500 pieces of garnet cloisonn jewellery.

It's called "Saxon Hoard: A Golden Discovery". This month the entire collection was moved to the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery where they underwent cleaning. It's on right now, watch it later on iPlayer or youtube.

The Staffordshire Hoard is a collection of Anglo-Saxon. And I was just looking at recent post from Richard Nokes' "Unlocked Wordhoard," and saw that there's a new Anglo-Saxon and Old English resources page, based at the University of Oxford, called the . The quality of the workmanship is extremely high which is remarkable in view of the large number of individual objects, such as . His hobby had garnered some success: in the past, he had recovered a piece of a horse's ornament from Roman times. These were probably 'heirloom' pieces, carefully looked after through the generations. In the online production of Hoard: Rediscovered, the New Vic revives a production from the 2015 Staffordshire Hoard Festival and finds new ways of telling a story in play-like tradition, but using cameras.

Few archaeological discoveries have generated the same level of public interest as the Staffordshire Hoard. A new BBC2 documentary on the Anglo-Saxon treasure found in Staffordshire in 2009 will be broadcast this January. Published: 23 Mar 2010. Experts are now making fascinating new discoveries as they put together the collection.

Over 3,500 pieces of Anglo-Saxon treasure were discovered in a farmer's . If Sutton Hoo is a Henry James novel, Staffordshire is (very nearly) Tristan Tzara's Hat. Reply. The Staffordshire Hoard. When Terry Herbert unearths the first pieces . Staffordshire Hoard Free Public Lecture Kevin Colls / 4 June 2014 Five years on from the discovery of the Staffordshire Hoard in a field near Lichfield, the Centre of Archaeology is hosting a free public lecture on the 11th of June at 7pm by Stephen Dean, the Principal Archaeologist for Staffordshire County Council. The artefacts have tentatively been dated to around 600 . That ancient booty, named the Staffordshire hoard, is the subject of Unearthed, a documentary drama streamed online by the New Vic theatre, and accompanied by 11 short films written by Sara Pascoe,. Now its results are revealed in The Staffordshire Hoard: An Anglo-Saxon Treasure, published by the Society of Antiquaries of London on 1 November, 2019. The Staffordshire Hoard The largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found The Story of The Hoard Explore the Hoard Conservation Journal Learning Visiting Partners and Funders Staffordshire Hoard helmets revealed for public display Research reveals approximately a third of the fragments in the Staffordshire Hoard come from a very high-status helmet. Looks pretty interesting and informative, and relevant. Extract from: BBC NewsMarion Blockley, an archaeologist, wonders if there is a clue in a lament written in around the 9th Century that describes a 7th Centur. Certainly, the hoard has already started to give up some cultural meaning. The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found. Oscars Best Picture Winners Best Picture Winners Emmys LGBTQ+ Pride Month STARmeter Awards San Diego Comic-Con New York Comic-Con Sundance Film Festival Toronto Int'l Film Festival Awards Central Festival Central All Events Show more. Download subtitles for "Staffordshire Hoard" (Dan Snow travels unravels the secrets of the Staffordshire Hoard.) Documentary Short Biography Staffordshire Hoard is a rhythmic viewing of two elderly lifelong Staffordshire-residents. Spectacular discoveries, such as the royal finds at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, had . The filigree work included in the Staffordshire Hoard is among the finest yet found in England, rivalling examples from Sutton Hoo. 1. History. One early pommel is the only example in the hoard which is not Anglo-Saxon, and was probably made in Sweden. They acquired the hoard after a 12-week fundraising campaign, in which 900,000 was raised through public donations, with funding from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and five local councils. The Staffordshire Hoard joins treasures from Sutton Hoo at the site of the famous Anglo-Saxon ship burial in Suffolk. A reconstruction of a gold helmet from the period. Anglo-Saxon .

The hoard was discovered in a field in Staffordshire, Great Britain, on 5 July 2009.

Find professional Staffordshire Hoard videos and stock footage available for license in film, television, advertising and corporate uses. The silver objects in the hoard are some of the earliest and latest in date. :) Delete. With 4,000 objects, it is the largest cache of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork . Key chapters discuss the decoration and meaning of the Hoard's intricate ornament, the techniques of Anglo-Saxon craftsmen, the religious and .

The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest collection of Anglo-Saxon (410 AD to 1066 AD) gold and silver metalwork ever found.It was discovered in a field near the village of Hammerwich, near Lichfield, Staffordshire (UK) on 5 July 2009.It consists of almost 4,600 items and fragments.The artefacts in the Staffordshire Hoard combine to nearly 4 kilos of gold, 1.7 kilos of silver and thousands of . Unknown 18 February 2013 at 02:28. aye no more time team, :0 .

The Staffordshire Hoard was discovered in July 2009, a chance find by an amateur treasure hunter with a metal detector working a newly ploughed field in the English Midlands. This is not the crude metallurgy of an uncultivated barbarian horde, but the beautiful design work in the noble metals of silver and gold that only a truly cultured people could produce. A spokesperson said: "The programme was partly researched and filmed at Lichfield Cathedral and includes footage of the St Chad Gospels and Lichfield Angel." The Staffordshire Hoard will be visiting Lichfield Cathedral from July 30 to August 21. Midlands. . The remarkable treasure trove totals some 4,000 objects and fragments: just about 13 pounds of gold, nearly 4 . Ever since the Hoard was discovered in a field near the . I.

It narrates the discovery of the hoard, embeds the find in its historical context, speculates about reasons behind the burial, and points out the relevance of the treasure for our understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture. The entire Staffordshire Hoard, over 4000 pieces, has been brought together for the first time since being discovered in 2009. Staffordshire Hoard. Documentaries. The remarkable treasure trove totals some 4,000 objects and fragments: just about 13 pounds of gold, nearly 4 . . The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest collection of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver treasure ever found.

Nowhere is this exemplified more than with the Staffordshire Hoard, the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon metalwork ever uncovered, even larger than the famous Sutton Hoo Hoard. Abstract. The find shows that those who created these pieces had utilized a "secret" technique, through which lower-grade gold with a high silver content could have the appearance of pure gold. Read all Director Simon Liu Writer

Found in a location not far from the ancient Roman thoroughfare, Watling Street, which is believed to have still been in use when the hoard was first buried. Telling the story of the discovery of a hoard of 1400 year old Anglo-Saxon treasure . .

Since it was discovered by a metal detector enthusiast in 2009, the Staffordshire Hoard has captured peoples' imaginations.

That finding alone completely transforms our understanding of Anglo-Saxon armies, according to Fern.

The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork yet found. Browse 177 staffordshire hoard stock photos and images available, or start a new search to explore more stock photos and images. The Hoard's significance for the understanding of the years 600-675 AD, a particularly turbulent time in Anglo-Saxon history, is now much clearer and [] The Staffordshire Hoard.

Written by a team of specialists in Anglo-Saxon archaeology and history, and expert conservators with unparalleled access to the Hoard, the text . The Staffordshire Hoard. All of the Staffordshire Hoard Treasure finds from 2009 and 2012 are now owned jointly by Birmingham and .

The Staffordshire Hoard: An Anglo-Saxon Treasure tells the story of the Staffordshire Hoard's discovery and acquisition, and the six-year research project that pieced its fragments back together, identified its objects and explored their manufacture. Replies. KEYWORDS: Staffordshire Hoard, Anglo Saxons, Mercia, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, BMAG, Potteries Museum and Art Gallery, Books.

It is the largest collection of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver ever discovered.

My friends at Medievalists.net recently linked to a report from last year on the Staffordshire Hoard field work. 2011.

Today the Staffordshire Hoard is back in the news: last November, again after the field had been recently ploughed, a team from Archaeology Warwickshire found a further 91 associated objects, and just 2 weeks ago, 81 of these were ruled to be treasure at a coroner's inquest. He asked the owner of the field for permission and then set about his business. Manufactured during the 6th and 7th Centuries, it was most likely buried in the 7th, but like so many relics of the . .

Its discovery in 2009 created a worldwide sensation and, 11 years later, it retains its appeal, giving the appearance of this report an importance beyond that of most academic publications.

It . . On July 5, 2009, a man decided to use his metal detector on a field in the village of Hammerwich, Staffordshire, England.

The treasure was initially found on a farm by an amateur .

Gold and gems emerged from the grass: the stuff of dreams. Show less 30 minutes But its size is only one way in which it is extraordinary.

The subsequent excavation by Birmingham Archaeology revealed the marvelous extent of what was buried. Great stuff. Seven years on from the discovery of the Staffordshire Hoard, two of the people behind the discovery, farmer Fred Johnson and archaeologist Steve Dean talk about how it changed history. The Staffordshire hoard is a find that has provided insight into the ancient Anglo-Saxon civilization, while also generating some questions. Staffordshire Hoard secrets revealed in landmark publication October 10, 2019 Following a decade of intensive conservation and expert research, a new book available from November will reveal the importance of the spectacular Staffordshire Hoard to our knowledge of British and world history. October 10, 2019. That ancient booty, named the Staffordshire hoard, is the subject of Unearthed, a documentary drama streamed online by the New Vic theatre, and accompanied by 11 short films written by Sara Pascoe . First, let's talk about the tale of the tape: The . In this film we find out about the first stage of conservation work on the artefacts .and what secrets have been revealed. Pilot study of surface enrichment in a selection of gold objects from the Staffordshire Hoard .

It consists of almost 4,600 items and metal fragments, amounting to a total of 5.1 kg (11 lb) of gold, 1.4 kg (3 lb) of silver and some 3,500 pieces of garnet cloisonn jewellery. The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest collection of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork ever found, anywhere in the world. Key chapters discuss the decoration and meaning of the Hoard's intricate ornament, the . you are here: home / theatre / broadway / new vic theatre awarded 198,000 arts council exceptional award to produce five-week festival of new writing inspired by the staffordshire hoard; new documentary play 'unearthed' based on 80 hours of new interviews with those involved in the find home / theatre / broadway / new vic theatre awarded At the time of its discovery the cache was thought to contain some 3,500 fragments, but this total is now close to 4,000, thanks in part to the discovery of an additional 81 pieces in the same field in 2012 (CA 276; their acquisition was funded by family jewellers .

This is the cathedral's greatest:19 . There is documentary evidence for several ancient methods for removing copper and silver from gold, and analysis of gold alloy objects from other periods and cultures have shown that deliberate surface enrichment was sometimes being undertaken. The Staffordshire Hoard: An Anglo-Saxon Treasure tells the story of the Hoard's discovery, acquisition for the nation, and the six-year research project that pieced its fragments back together, identified its objects and explored their manufacture.

Getty Images offers exclusive rights-ready and premium royalty-free analog, HD, and 4K video of the highest quality. The reconstructed helmets are going on show in Birmingham and Stoke-on-Trent. The largest ever haul of Anglo-Saxon gold in Britain, the so-called Staffordshire Hoard, was discovered buried beneath a farmer's field in Staffordshire in July 2009. In addition, the final scene with the . Following a decade of intensive conservation and expert research, a new book available from November will reveal the importance of the spectacular Staffordshire Hoard to our knowledge of British and world history. The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found.

Marking 40 years of Art Fund's partnership with the Wolfson Foundation, 'Transforming Collections' profiles four key acquisitions made possible through our j.

And for the ones who don't know what the "Staffordshire Hoard" is, google it right now! Here's what they found in 11 of the most dazzling hoards ever discovered. It has more than 1,500 items, made of gold and silver, embedded with precious stones and jewels. Gives a very good feeling for the period. Coordinates: 523919N 15424W / 52.65528N 1.90667W / 52.65528; -1.90667 The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork yet found[update].

Staffordshire Hoard.

Modest and contained are their lives who like many go unrecorded. Hoard: Rediscovered will be screened at Staffordshire's New Vic Theatre from Saturday 7 to Saturday 14 November.

The Staffordshire Hoard, as it was quickly dubbed, electrified the general public and Anglo-Saxon scholars alike.

Treasures are displayed as part of the the Staffordshire Hoard, the UK's largest collection of . Saxon Hoard: A Golden Discovery Dan Snow travels across the old Kingdom of Mercia to unravel the secrets of one of Britian's most significant discoveries - the Staffordshire Hoard. Staffordshire Hoard on National Geographic Channel This Sunday at 9 PM EST, the National Geographic Channel will broadcast an hour-long documentary about the Staffordshire Hoard called Lost Gold of the Dark Ages. However, the new find did include a helmet cheek piece, the pair to the one in the original collection.

Chris Fern, Tania Dickinson and Leslie Webster (Society of Antiquaries, 2019) was a milestone in the study of the hoard, some ten years after the hoard's discovery in Staffordshire by a metal-detectorist.The volume is first and foremost a catalogue of the remarkable finds. The Staffordshire hoard of Anglo-Saxon treasure found last year will receive a 1.3m Heritage Memorial Fund grant to allow it to remain in Midlands museums.

The Staffordshire Hoard: An Anglo-Saxon Treasure tells the story of the Staffordshire Hoard's discovery and acquisition, and the six-year research project that pieced its fragments back together, identified its objects and explored their manufacture.

The book is supported by a wealth of full-colour illustrations, explanatory drawings and an online resource. It narrates the discovery of the hoard, embeds the find in its historical context, speculates about reasons behind the burial, and points out the relevance of the treasure for our understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture. Great stuff. There is a clear sense, in the fitful attempts to interpret and contextualize the objects, that their mysteriousness is to be understood as an essential part of their nature.

Discovered in a field near the village of Hammerwich, near Lichfield, in Staffordshire, England, in 2009. it consists of over 3, 500 items, dated to the 7th or 8th centuries, placing the origin of the items in the time of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia. Reply. Discovered in a field near the village of Hammerwich, near Lichfield, in Staffordshire, England, on 5 July 2009, it consists of over 3,500 items that are nearly all martial in character and . After a superbly successful national appeal, the Staffordshire Hoard, valued at well in excess of 3 million, was purchased for the public benefit and is now jointly owned by Stoke-on-Trent City Council and Birmingham City Council. [1] The Staffordshire hoard contains 50. The results will be detailed in the documentary on BBC1 on Sunday (July 3) at 6pm.

A new BBC2 documentary on the Anglo-Saxon treasure found in Staffordshire in 2009 will be broadcast this January.

The Discovery Metal detectorist, Terry Herbert, discovered the find most metal . Two of the most iconic names associated with Anglo-Saxon England come together in a new exhibition as the treasures of the Staffordshire Hoard head to Sutton Hoo, the famous ancient burial mound in Suffolk that yielded the imprint of a decayed ship and a central chamber filled . Discovered in a field near the village of Hammerwich, near Lichfield, in Staffordshire, England, on 5 July 2009, it consists of over 3,500 items that are nearly all martial in character and . Simon Liu, Writer: Staffordshire Hoard. Staffordshire Hoard found in Lichfield, UK The Anglo-Saxons were and are renowned for their metalwork. Really helps to bring to life this era, which is generally suffering from lack of material evidence. The Staffordshire hoard is the largest treasure haul of its kind.

It is set to offer fascinating discoveries about England in the seventh century.

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I am itching to watch the documentary to see all the details.

The book is edited by two of the Department's Honorary Fellows, Chris Fern and . Subtitles Found! The majority of the Staffordshire Hoard treasure was crafted between the mid-sixth and mid-seventh centuries AD and buried between 650-675 AD.

and moves it into the theatrical realm, differentiating it from a TV or museum documentary. Key chapters discuss the decoration and meaning of the Hoard's intricate ornament . Factual. Home.

The Staffordshire hoard, as it has become known, is the largest, most noteworthy collection of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork ever found, comprising 4,000 objects and fragments, most of .

Nothing like this has ever been found in Britain before – sixteen hundred pieces of bejewelled gold and silver, buried, lost then forgotten. Abstract: The publication of The Staffordshire Hoard.An Anglo-Saxon Treasure, ed. In this film we find out about the first stage of conservation work on the artef. The Staffordshire find, on the other hand, is a jumble. Coordinates: 523919N 15424W / 52.65528N 1.90667W / 52.65528; -1.90667 The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork yet found[update]. On 4 January 2013, a coroner's court inquest ruled that these further Treasure items were part of the world famous Staffordshire Hoard. Following a decade of intensive conservation and expert research, a new book is revealing the importance of the spectacular Staffordshire Hoard to our knowledge of British and world history. A selection of objects from the Staffordshire Hoard, including the . The hoard, which is valued at 3.2m, was found in a field near Burntwood, Staffordshire in July 2009. With more than 650 items made from gold, and more than 500 in silver this is truly a king's ransom! After a superbly successful national appeal, the Staffordshire Hoard, valued at well in excess of 3 million, was purchased for the public benefit and is now jointly owned by Stoke-on-Trent City Council and Birmingham City Council. Leahy observes:This is not simply loot; swords were being singled out for special treatment. The hoard, which is valued at 3.2m, was found in a farmer's field near Burntwood, Staffordshire in July 2009. ISBN 978-1527233508. Review Kevin Leahy. Alan and Vera begin the journey of being recorded by their grandson and in their vital moments they retell their history. The hoard was most likely deposited in the 7th century, and contains artefacts probably manufactured during the 6th and 7th centuries. Pieces discovered near Lichfield nine years ago are .

Investigating the objects that make up the hoard reveals exceptional insights into Anglo-Saxon society in the 6th and 7th century AD - a time of profound change. Both items have been put on display at Birmingham's Museum and Art Gallery from Tuesday.